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Question Time With Elena Seranova

Recently, I’ve come up with a bunch of questions to ask people who’ve worked with autism or people who are researching it in order to get more insight on global opinions on autism. I’m hoping to continue this series and have more people share their stories. Today, I have a guest blogger – Elena Seranova!

Originally from Greece, Elena obtained a major in Psychology and got involved in parent consulting and biofeedback sessions to reduce stress in autistic individuals.


IJ: “How did you get involved with working with autism?”

ES: Back in 2011, I attended a healthcare conference in Copenhagen, Denmark and had the opportunity to meet Gail Wylie, a Canadian therapist. She is an author of many books on autism and introduced me to both holistic consulting and biofeedback applications that lead to stress reduction of autistic individuals. Since I was working with the same biofeedback device Gail had back in Greece, we extensively discussed the applications of it and how they can help in reducing repetitive behaviours and other autistic symptoms- mostly calming down the patient.

IJ: “What should researchers be directing their focus on more?”

ES: The multifactorial pathology of autism creates the need for an integrative approach in research. For instance, some of the autistic patients demonstrate remarkable improvement when the daily nutrition is improved (gluten products and sugar excluded). This is not the case with all the autistic individuals and the genetic factors of this differentiation need to be investigated.

IJ: “In your country, do you think that there is adequate or inadequate funding for care and research in autism?”

ES: Greece is currently a country with limited financial resources and the healthcare industry is heavily impacted by the economic crisis we are going through. Last year I participated in a charity organization based in Thessaloniki, Greece. We managed to raise and donate a thousand euros to the Adults Autism Shelter “Sunshine” in order to sponsor the purchase of some new furniture. Since autistic individuals have sometimes the tendency to present self-harming behaviours, this also includes the breaking of all kinds of furniture such as chairs, tables etc. However, this kind of initiative is limited in my country.   There is practically no governmental help for such institutions. Same goes for research. Greek universities currently don’t offer a salary for PhD students meaning that undertaking research means that you also need to work at least part-time to cover your expenses. This of course impacts the quality of the research as well.

IJ:” What can be done about this?”

ES: I believe that foreign organisations should be sponsoring research in regions where there is willingness to conduct high quality research. Awareness is an important part of the funding process so the first step to be taken is to raise it. Social campaigns need to demonstrate the urgency of finding new ways to cope with autistic symptoms; as the global statistics are rising and future generations might have to deal with pandemic rates of autism in the next few decades.

IJ:” What is more important, Acceptance or Awareness?”

ES: My opinion is that both are important and need to be present in today’s society. Awareness is necessary for supporting the scientific research progress and donations that result in a better life quality of some autistic individuals, especially the ones that live in shelters.

Acceptance on the other hand is primarily crucial in our day to day communication with autistics, whether it’s a relative, our child or a patient. Especially in young families, it is sometimes hard to accept the symptoms of ASD. This results in delayed diagnosis and a delay in any kind of therapeutic support. Moreover, when parents do not accept the fact that their child is different than other children, this leads to ignorance of the child’s needs and a poor parent-child interaction, which is already impaired due to autistic symptoms. This may sound strange but sometimes when working with autistic children and getting to know them better, when I see how their mother talks in front of them about their “condition” as they call it, I feel so angry. And as a result I’ll say that I don’t care about the acceptance of the autistic individuals in the society, I just struggle to make the parent understand how important for their children is the acceptance of who they are. The social acceptance is as well necessary, but the parental acceptance is the one that will create optimised daily conditions for an autistic child to be themselves.

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Elena working with Indigo Biofeedback in Greece.


~ If you are interested in reading more posts from Elena, please have a look at a her blog on www.elenaseranova.com

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